Engels

RESEARCH ARTICLEPower in the metropolis: the impact of economicand demographic growth on the Antwerp CityCouncil (1400–1550)Janna Everaert*†Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Building C–Room5.457, Pleinlaan 2, BE-1050 Brussels, Belgium/Universiteit Antwerpen, Department of History, Faculty ofArts and Philosophy, City Campus–Room S.SJ.216, Sint-Jacobsmarkt 13, BE-2000 Antwerpen, Belgium*Corresponding author. Email:Janna.Everaert@vub.ac.be;Janna.Everaert@uantwerpen.beAbstractCurrent historiography endorses a narrative that the political elite of pre-industrial gate-way cities became more‘open’in the wake of efflorescence and that their city councilsbecame populated with merchants. Yet, according to the existing literature, Antwerp chal-lenges this narrative, as the influx of merchants was very limited during late fifteenth andearly sixteenth centuries when Antwerp transformed from a medium-sized Brabantinecity into the leading economic centre in western Europe. Moreover, scholars disagreeon whether the economic expansion had any impact at all on the composition and profileof Antwerp’s political elite. By analysing the social composition of the city council andhow this evolved from the beginning of Antwerp’s commercial expansion around 1400until its apogee around 1550, I revisit the question whether Antwerp constitutes an excep-tion to the established pattern of elite formation in gateway cities and, if so, why.IntroductionIn 1561, the members of the Antwerp City Council laid the foundation stone oftheir new town hall, which had been designed to reflect the town’s recently gainedcommercial importance (seeFigure 1). Antwerp had already been an important fairtown during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, but when it replaced Bruges as acentral gateway city for international trade in the 1490s it experienced a spectaculareconomic expansion.1Over the course of a few decades, the town was transformedfrom a medium-sized Brabantine town into the leading metropolis of the†This article is based on a paper I presented at the European Social Science History Conference 2016 inValencia. I want to thank Frederik Buylaert, Frederik Peeraer, the editorial board and the three anonymousreferees for their comments on earlier versions of this article.1For more information on Antwerp’s economic expansion, see H. Van der Wee,The Growth of theAntwerp Market and the European Economy, 3 vols. (The Hague, 1963); O. Gelderblom,Cities ofCommerce: The Institutional Foundations of International Trade in the Low Countries, 1250–1650(Princeton, 2013), 27–32. For an overview of Antwerp’s economic importance during the fourteenthand fifteenth centuries, see M. Limberger,‘Regional and interregional trading networks and commercial© Cambridge University Press 2019Urban History(2019), 1–21doi:10.1017/S096392681900066Xuse, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of dominated by individuals whose revenues came from trade, either directly (e.g.merchants) or indirectly (e.g. brokers).8Amsterdam, which functioned as the gate-way city of the Netherlands in the seventeenth century, was also ruled by mer-chants.9In contrast, the merchant community of Antwerp was largely absentfrom the city council.10Antwerp is thus relevant to ongoing debates about pre-modern elites, because this city apparently presents a very different trajectory tothat shown by other gateway cities.What is beyond doubt is that the formal composition of the office-holders sawlittle change during the‘Golden Age’of Antwerp. During the fifteenth century, thecity council consisted of 12 aldermen, a number that was increased to 16 aldermenin 1490. From 1409 onwards, two mayors joined the city council. The‘externalmayor’(buitenburgemeester), who could not be selected from among the aldermen,became the more important figure as he represented the city’s interests beyond itsborders, for example at the princely court. The‘internal mayor’(binnenburgemeester),chosen from among the aldermen, was responsible for the city’s internal affairs. Eachyear this city council changed: half of the aldermen were replaced and half wereretained. This new bench of aldermen then selected the two new mayors. The alder-men and the two mayors were jointly responsible for the day-to-day governing of thecity. The decision as to which of the aldermen should stay on and which should bereplaced was made by the duke of Brabant, lord of Antwerp. Until 1477, the duke wasfree to choose who would serve as replacements (seeFigure 3).11Subsequently, theduke was obliged to select the replacements from a list of candidates proposed bythe city council in office and the ward masters (wijkmeesters, representatives of thepoorterij12).13Candidates for the city council had to meet certain requirements. First, the can-didate had to be of legitimate birth, at least 25 years old, born in the duchy ofBrabant, a citizen of Antwerp for at least a year and a day, and not living in adul-tery. Second, theten derdalven lederule prohibited aldermen from serving on thesame bench as their father, grandfather, brother(s) or cousin(s). This rule preventedthe city council from becoming monopolized by a few families. The third and final8J. Dumolyn,De Brugse opstand van 1436–1438(Heule, 1997), 111–15.9J.E. Elias,De vroedschappen van Amsterdam, 2 vols. (Haarlem, 1903–05).10K. Wouters,‘Een open oligarchie? De machtsstructuur in de Antwerpse magistraat tijdens de periode1520–1555’,Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Filologie en Geschiedenis, 82 (2004), 905–34; K. Wouters,‘De invloedvan verwantschap op de machtsstrijd binnen de Antwerpse politieke elite’,Tijdschrift voor sociale geschie-denis, 28 (2002), 30–51; An M. Kint,‘The community of commerce: social relations in sixteenth-centuryAntwerp’, Columbia University Ph.D. thesis, 1996, 292; G. Marnef,Antwerp in the Age of Reformation.Underground Protestantism in a Commercial Metropolis, 1550–1577(Baltimore and London, 1996), 17.11In fact, before 1477 the number of aldermen being replaced fluctuated wildly. Database Janna Everaert,City Government Antwerp 1394–1560, retrieved 6 Feb. 2018.12The termpoorterijhas two meanings. In juridical terms, thepoorterijmeans all men who have citizen-ship rights in Antwerp. More generally, thepoorterijrefers to the well-to-do inhabitants of the city apartfrom the craftsmen. In this article, the term has the latter meaning. The ward masters, however, representedall men who had obtained citizenship rights, including the craft guilds.13This change in the election process does not seem to have affected the composition of the citycouncil. R. Boumans,Het Antwerps stadsbestuur voor en tijdens de Franse overheersing: bijdrage tot deontwikkelingsgeschiedenis van de stedelijke bestuursinstellingen in de Zuidelijke Nederlanden(Bruges,1965), 13.4Janna Everaertuse, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of constraint was that members of craft guilds were prohibited from serving on thecity council. So in contrast to the situation in many large towns in the SouthernLow Countries, Antwerp’s growing community of craftsmen were unable to gainpermanent representation in the city council.14Except for a short-lived period ofco-rule between the craft guilds andpoorterij(1477 to 1486) after the so-calledQuaeye Werelt(Angry World revolt), the craft guilds were excluded frompower.15As a result, city governance remained concentrated in the hands of mem-bers of thepoorterij.16However, whether the profile of these members changed inAntwerp’s Golden Age is still a subject of debate.Figure 3.Diagram of the election process ofthe Antwerp City Council between 1477 and155514M. Prak,‘Corporate politics in the Low Countries: guilds as institutions, 14th to 18th centuries’,inM. Praket al. (eds.),Craft Guilds in the Early Modern Low Countries. Work, Power, and Representation(Aldershot, 2006), 74–106.15Instead, the craftsmen were assigned a role in two councils, the so-called Monday council–as of1435–and the broad council. However, the former only had an advisory function and the latter didnot exert real power until the last quarter of the sixteenth century. Neither of these councils played arole in the election of the city council. For more information on these councils, see Boumans,HetAntwerps stadsbestuur,21–43; for an English overview of the different political institutions in Antwerp,see Marnef,Antwerp in the Age,14–22.16Only 3 of the 162 political families had a connection to craft guild circles: the families Hoon, Schoyteand Mannaert. However, the scions of these families do not seem to have been craftsmen themselves.Database Janna Everaert, City Government Antwerp 1394–1560, retrieved 6 Feb. 2018.Urban History5use, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of While the nature, causes and timing of Antwerp’s economic expansion betweenc. 1400 andc. 1550 have been the subject of a continuous research tradition thatstretches back to the seminal work of Herman van der Wee in the 1960s,17theimpact of the town’s transformation on the political elite has received far less atten-tion. Current theories on Antwerp’s exceptional trajectory in elite formation pro-ceed from the exploratory research of An Kint for the period 1490–1560 andKoen Wouters for 1520–55.18Both historians agree that there were a surprisinglysmall number of merchants in the Antwerp City Council, but they present diamet-rically opposed interpretations of the impact of the economic and demographicgrowth on the composition of the city council. According to Kint, economic growthtriggered a radical change in the composition of the city council such that, whilemerchants were perhaps not included in the city council, the‘traditional markersof political participation, such as ancestry and endogamy, gradually gave way tonew indicators, such as university training’.19The inclusion of more university-trained men would have allowed the city council to cope with the city’s new func-tion as an arena for increasingly complex commercial transactions that involvedbusiness partners from nearly every corner of Europe. In contrast, Wouters refutesKint’s claims in that he stresses the continuing importance of endogamy and kin-ship relations within a‘patriciate’. Although some newcomers entered the citycouncil between 1520 and 1555, Wouters sees the Golden Age of Antwerp as a per-iod of social and political continuity. The city council, he claims, continued to bedominated by the same political dynasties as those that had been in power since thefourteenth and fifteenth centuries. He therefore labels the political elite of Antwerpan‘open oligarchy’.20As Kint’s research has so far been unpublished, it is Wouters’interpretation that dominates the historiography on Antwerp’s Golden Age. Yet,since neither Kint nor Wouters compared their results with the pre-growth period,both claims remain highly hypothetical.21Also, their research was hampered by theabsence of in-depth studies on Antwerp’s merchant communities, which have onlyrecently become available. In what follows, I revisit the question of whetherAntwerp constitutes an exception to the established pattern of elite formation ingateway cities, and, if so, why.I focus on the social composition of the Antwerp City Council and how thisevolved over time. An analysis covering the period from the beginning of17For two recent studies that provide an inroad to the vast historiography, see Gelderblom,Cities ofCommerce; J. Puttevils,Merchants and Trading in the Sixteenth Century. The Golden Age of Antwerp(London, 2015).18As an introduction to his study on Antwerp during the Reformation, Guido Marnef also discusses thecomposition of the Antwerp City Council between 1550 and 1560. Marnef,Antwerp in the Age,14–17.19Kint,‘The community of commerce’, 292.20Wouters,‘De invloed’,55–6; Wouters,‘Een open oligarchie?’, 933–4.21Wouters makes some tentative comparisons with the pre-1477 period, but he does not mention whichsources or literature he used for this comparison. He probably employed the lists of the members of the citycouncil compiled and published by Floris Prims. F. Prims,Geschiedenis van Antwerpen–VII: Onder deeerste Habsburgers–1: De politische orde(Antwerp, 1938). Yet, Wouters himself declares that these listsare far from complete and far from flawless. Moreover, neither Kint nor Wouters made use of the unpub-lished master’s thesis of Tahon on the fifteenth-century city council of Antwerp. G. Tahon,‘De schepen-bank van Antwerpen, einde 14de–15de eeuw: samenstelling, sociaal-economische status van de schepenen’,2 vols., Ghent University MA thesis, 1984.6Janna Everaertuse, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of Antwerp’s commercial expansion around 1400 to the city’s apogee around 155022can reveal whether or not the political elite of Antwerp’s Golden Age had the samesocial configuration as its medieval predecessors. The following parameters are key:(1) family tradition and kinship ties in urban politics, (2) economic background(merchant or not) and (3) academic training. An analysis of these parameterswill help to situate the case of Antwerp in the current discussions on urban eliteformation and shed light on the question: does Antwerp fit into the generaltrend towards oligarchy in European towns in the early modern era or, on the con-trary, did it open up its city council to the merchant class?Urban politics: a family affairThe best point of departure is to assess whether the Antwerp political elite was a‘patriciate’, i.e. a group of intermarried families with a near-hereditary claim topower, or a more fluid group that accepted a constant inflow of new familieswith diverse social backgrounds. To answer this question, I reconstructed the com-position of the city council during the period of economic growth and the preced-ing period. Each year, the new make-up of the Antwerp City Council was recordedin the registers of aldermen (schepenregisters) and the book of aldermen (wethou-dersboek).23Thanks to these sources, I have a complete list of all the men (hereaftercalled office-holders) who held the 2,177 seats available in the city council between1400 and 1549.24A wide range of other published and unpublished researchprovided information on the socio-economic background and family ties of thispolitical elite.25To assess how the social composition of the Antwerp City Council evolved,I divided the 150-year period under study into five time cohorts of 30 years.While the first two cohorts (1400–29 and 1430–59) cover a phase of modestdemographic and economic growth, the third (1460–89) includes the short-lived22This study ends in 1550 for several reasons. First, the period 1550–66 has already been thoroughlydescribed by Guido Marnef. Secondly, this period witnessed the first signs of economic decline. Finally,the 1550s and 1560s witnessed rising religious tensions, and untangling the influence of this variablewould require additional research. Marnef,Antwerp in the Age,14–17; H. Soly,‘De schepenregisters alsbron voor de conjunctuurgeschiedenis van Zuid- en Noordnederlandse steden in het Ancien Régime.Een concreet voorbeeld: de Antwerpse immobiliënmarkt in de 16de eeuw’,Tijdschrift voor geschiedenis,87 (1974), 521–44.23The city council was renewed annually on 30 November until 1538, after which the renewal took placeat Easter. Stadsarchief Antwerpen (SAA), Schepenregisters (SR), nos. 1–272; the book of aldermen, whichwas drawn up in the sixteenth century, was used to fill the gap in the registers of aldermen between 1480and 1489. SAA, Privilegiekamer (PK), no. 1341. F. Prims,‘Onze Antwerpsche wethoudersboeken’,inAntwerpiensia 1932. Losse Bijdragen tot de Antwerpsche Geschiedenis(Antwerp, 1933), 252–60.24This list and additional information on family relations, university training, date of birth and deathand economic status were gathered in one database. Database Janna Everaert, City Government Antwerp1394–1560, retrieved 6 Feb. 2018 (referred to as CGA in the tables and figures).25The main sources on the political elite as a social body were SAA, PK, nos. 3254–67, 3272 (L.Bisschops,‘Genealogische Nota’s’); Tahon,‘De schepenbank van Antwerpen’; K. Wouters,‘Tussen ver-wantschap en vermogen. De politieke elite in Antwerpen (1520–1555). Een elite onderzoek door middelvan de prosopografische methode’, Vrije Universiteit Brussel MA thesis, 2001; P. De Win,‘De adel inhet hertogdom Brabant in de vijftiende eeuw (ingezonderd de periode 1430–1482)’, Ghent UniversityMA thesis, 1979; H. De Ridder-Symoens,‘De universitaire vorming van de Brabantse stadsmagistraat enstadsfuctionarissen: Leuven en Antwerpen, 1430–1580’,Varia Historica Brabantica,6–7 (1978), 26–32.Urban History7use, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of experiment of corporate participation in urban government (1477–86). The last twotime cohorts encompass Antwerp’s Golden Age. They roughly correspond to thefirst phase of economic growth (1490–1519), during which Antwerp took overthe role of Bruges as a gateway city and the second phase (1520–49), when thecity evolved from a fair town into a major commercial and financial centre thatwas crucial to the Low Countries as well as western Europe as a whole.I charted which families comprised the city’s political elite (hereafter called‘pol-itical families’), how long they were active in the city council, how many mandatesthey held and how they were inter-related. Following the definition commonlyaccepted in previous research, I defined a family as all the individuals with a com-mon last name. As a consequence, these‘families’are more comparable to patrilin-eal lineages than to households, as even among the elite most households consistedof the nuclear family. While this choice was a pragmatic one, the reconstruction offamily relations and family trees confirms that these individuals with a commonlast name can be linked to one another through kinship ties.26Moreover, recentresearch on the importance of the extended family for elites and middling groupsin fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Brabant reveals that this choice to study lineagesalso mirrors social mores: urban elites, just like the rural nobility, tended to identifythemselves as patrilineal families (geslachten).27That is not to say that the concept ofthe extended family was static: some of the leading political dynasties stemmed fromthe same family tree, but then renamed their branch after becoming alienated fromthe main branch or after gaining an important possession, such as a seigneurie. TheVan Liere family, for example, disassociated itself from the Van Immerseele family.28However, this rarely happened and, barring a certain plasticity in the way thegeslachtendefined themselves, the patrilineal family is the unit of analysis thatbest matches how contemporaries analysed the social fabric of urban politics.The reconstruction of the Antwerp political elite of 1400–1550 is summarized inTable 1andFigure 4, which show the inflow and outflow of families in the city council.First and foremost, this reveals that the social renewal over time was substantial. Whilethe number of families that held the available seats on the bench of aldermen remainedquite stable over time–usually some 50 to 60 families for each time cohort–thefamilies that constituted the Antwerp political elite in 1520–49 were in the main notthose that ruled the city in 1400–29.29Of the 57 families providing an aldermanbetween 1520 and 1549, only 16 could retrace their political activities to before 1460.There are three causes of this constant process of social renewal. The first was alack of male heirs. As a rule, only three out of five marriages yielded an adult son26The genealogical notes on these families by L. Bisschops were very valuable in determining whichindividuals belonged to the same family and which did not. Thanks to this source, I was able to refinemy analysis and resolve the problem of homonyms. SAA, PK, nos. 3254–67, 3272.27K. Overlaet,‘Familiaal kapitaal. De familiale netwerken van testateurs in het zestiende-eeuwseMechelen’, Antwerp University Ph.D. thesis, 2015, 227–32; B. Blondé, F. Buylaert, J. Dumolyn, J. Hanusand P. Stabel,‘Samenleven in de stad: sociale relaties tussen ideaal en realiteit’, in A.L. Van Bruaene,B. Blondé and M. Boone (eds.),Gouden Eeuwen. Stad en samenleving in de Lage Landen, ca. 1100–1600(Ghent, 2016), 77–120.28De Win,‘De adel’, 388.29All the politically active families were divided into five 30-year cohorts, depending on the first time thisfamily was mentioned in the lists of office-holders between 1400 and 1550.8Janna Everaertuse, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of and politics was a men-only affair.30The Van der Elst family, for example, becameextinct in the male line. Another reason why families disappeared from the citycouncil was migration.31For example, Adriaen van Doren, who was an aldermanin Antwerp, moved to Breda and became a mayor there.32On the other hand,migration sometimes led to the inflow of new families, particularly if their membershad enjoyed political careers in their town of origin. Jan van Gottignies, forinstance, entered the Antwerp City Council in 1514 and was a member of an influ-ential family of aldermen from Mechelen.33A third reason why a political careercould end was a dwindling family fortune.34As a result of these factors, eachTable 1.Inflow and outflow of politically active families in the Antwerp City Council, 1400–15491400–291430–591460–891490–15191520–49Families 1400–295929161410New families 1430–590221186New families 1460–890040127New families 1490–1519000169New families 1520–49000025Total5951675057Source:CGA.Figure 4.Inflow and outflow of politically active families in the Antwerp City Council, 1400–1549Source:CGA.30M. Nassiet,‘Parenté et successions dynastiques aux 14e et 15e siècles’,Annales. Histoire, SciencesSociales, 3 (1995), 621.31Wouters,‘De invloed’, 43; database Janna Everaert, City Government Antwerp 1394–1560, retrieved 6Feb. 2018.32Wouters,‘De invloed’, 44.33See Frederik Buylaert’s contribution to this special section.34These offices yielded a very low income, which could not sustain the elite lifestyle associated with office-holders. For more information on their wages, see Tahon,‘De schepenbank van Antwerpen’, vol. I, 111.Urban History9use, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of year a number of families disappeared from the political scene and were replaced bynew families in the city council. So the Antwerp political elite was in constant socialflux. The concept of a‘patriciate’, as in a stable group of families that rule a townover an extended period, therefore does not apply to the political elite of Antwerp.However, it does describe a nucleus of prominent familieswithinthis elite.The claim by Koen Wouters that the sixteenth-century elite was simply a con-tinuation of a‘medieval’social configuration is based on an atypical and selectgroup of families. The tendency to regard the Antwerp political elite as a‘patriciate’is understandable, insofar as there certainly were true‘political dynasties’that wereexceptionally powerful, some of which were remarkably long-lived.Table 2showsthe nine leading political dynasties that held more than 25 per cent of all mandates.It is to these dynastic families that Wouters referred when he stated that the citycouncil remained under the control of a‘patriciate’that had governed Antwerpsince the fourteenth century. Undoubtedly, many of these families did have a long-standing tradition of urban politics. Members of the families Van Halmale, Van derElst, Van Berchem, Van Ranst and Schoyte became aldermen in Antwerp as early asthe fourteenth century. The political power of the families Drake and Van denWerve even stretches back to the thirteenth century.35The accumulated politicalcapital and experience–insofar as it was transferred from one generation to thenext–must have been a great advantage to the new generations of these familiesthat wanted to start a political career. If nothing else, it must have endowedthese families with considerable prestige. Only the powerful Van Liere family wasa late bloomer. The family’s first urban politician took up office in 1465 and theVan Lieres then proceeded to generate an almost continuous stream of office-holders until 1538, thereby joining the ranks of the town’s main political dynasties.Yet, the influence of these political dynasties, however great when observed overthe long term, fluctuated greatly over time. The Van der Elst family, for example,belonged to the leading dynasties at the beginning of the fifteenth century, as itwas the family with the most mandates between 1400 and 1429, but its politicalweight gradually declined and the family disappeared from the scene in the1520s. In contrast, the number of seats on the bench of aldermen held by theTable 2.Leading political dynasties in the Antwerp City Council, 1400–1549FamiliesNumber of mandates Percentage Number of office-holders PercentageVan den Werve1516.94%226.45%Van Berchem1084.96%154.40%Drake1024.69%102.93%Van Halmale823.77%113.23%Van Liere632.89%72.05%Van der Elst612.80%92,64%Van Ranst582.66%72.05%Schoyte542.48%41.17%Van Immerseele522.39%61.76%Total for entire period2177100%341100%Source:CGA.35Ibid., 66.10Janna Everaertuse, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of Van Halmale, Drake and Van Berchem families was quite modest at the beginningof the fifteenth century, but the figure rose spectacularly so that by the 1490s theybelonged to the top five most important political families. The one family whosepolitical fortunes never wavered was the Van den Werve family. They managedto maintain a dominant position in the city council throughout the entire period,as they delivered at least one office-holder to the city council in 119 of the 150 yearsunder investigation. In comparison to the other leading political dynasties, how-ever, the constant presence of the Van den Werve family in the Antwerp CityCouncil is the exception, not the rule. More importantly, the political dynastiesonly formed a small segment of the 162 different families that provided at leastone alderman to the city council between 1400 and 1550. Although the politicaldynasties discussed above enjoyed almost constant representation in the city coun-cil, this was not the case for the majority of the other families, which were fre-quently replaced.Nevertheless, the political elite of Antwerp did remain stable over time, albeit ina different way to that claimed by Wouters. First, the number of families compris-ing the political elite fluctuated only slightly over time. In the course of the fifteenthcentury, the number of political families (seeTable 1) decreased from 59 to 51, withan exceptional peak of 67 in the 1460–89 cohort because this includes the period ofco-rule by the craft guilds and thepoorterij(1477–85). This short-lived expansionof political power led to the inflow of 26 craft guild families, which were quicklyejected again.36Consequently, the number of political families fell to its lowerpre-1477 level, with 50 families. During the second phase of Antwerp’s economicgrowth, the political elite expanded again to almost reach the level of the early fif-teenth century.Another finding is that throughout the 150-year period under investigation, theinternal power balance within the political elite remained stable, as revealed byFigure 5. This Lorenz curve shows, for each of the five time cohorts, all the familieswith at least one mandate hierarchically ordered from low to high in a cumulativeway according to the number of offices they held. As a rule, the top 7 and 18 percent of the political families held respectively 25 and 50 per cent of all offices. Bycontrast, the bottom 18 per cent of all families barely held 3 per cent. Only the1520–49 cohort has a slightly different division of mandates as more familiesheld only one or two offices. This observation calls into question current specula-tions that the sixteenth-century elite configurations were a continuation of the per-iod before 1520. These results also show that, despite the explosion in Antwerp’spopulation from 10,000 to 100,000 inhabitants and the increase in the numberof seats in the city council from 12 to 16, the social basis of the political elitedid not expand. In fact, the political elite became a more exclusive group inurban society.36These 26 families were new to the city council with the exception of the Schoyte family, ascraftsman-alderman Aert Schoyte senior was the cousin of Jan Schoyte, who had entered the city councilin 1449 as apoorter. After 1485, three sons of craftsmen-aldermen succeeded in entering the political eliteas representatives of thepoorterij: Aert Schoyte junior, Joos Mannaert and Joos Hoon. Tahon,‘De schepen-bank van Antwerpen’, vol. I, 73, vol. II, 83.Urban History11use, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of

Nederlands

ONDERZOEK ARTIKEL Kracht in de metropool: de impact van economische en demografische groei op de Antwerp CityCouncil (1400-1550) Janna Everaert * † Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Departement Geschiedenis, Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, Gebouw C – Room5.457, Pleinlaan 2, BE -1050 Brussel, België / Universiteit Antwerpen, Departement Geschiedenis, Faculteit van Kunst en Wijsbegeerte, Stadscampus - Kamer S.SJ.216, Sint-Jacobsmarkt 13, BE-2000 Antwerpen, België * Corresponderende auteur. E-mail: Janna.Everaert@vub.ac.be; Janna.Everaert@uantwerpen.beAbstractHistorische geschiedschrijving onderschrijft een verhaal dat de politieke elite van pre-industriële poortsteden meer 'open' werd in de nasleep van bloei en dat hun gemeenteraad werd bevolkt met handelaren. Maar volgens de bestaande literatuur daagt Antwerpen dit verhaal uit, omdat de toestroom van handelaren in de late vijftiende en zestiende eeuw zeer beperkt was toen Antwerpen transformeerde van een middelgrote Brabantinecity naar het toonaangevende economische centrum in West-Europa. Bovendien zijn wetenschappers het er niet mee eens of de economische expansie überhaupt een impact had op de samenstelling en het profiel van de politieke elite van Antwerpen.Door de sociale samenstelling van de gemeenteraad te analyseren en hoe dit evolueerde vanaf het begin van de commerciële expansie van Antwerpen rond 1400 tot zijn hoogtepunt rond 1550, kijk ik opnieuw op de vraag of Antwerpen een uitzondering vormt op het gevestigde patroon van elitevorming in gateway-steden en, als dus, waarom.Inleiding In 1561 legden de leden van de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen de eerste steen voor hun nieuwe stadhuis, dat was ontworpen om het recentelijk verworven commerciële belang van de stad te weerspiegelen (zie figuur 1). Antwerpen was in de veertiende en vijftiende eeuw al een belangrijke kermis geweest, maar toen het in de jaren 1490 Brugge als acentrale toegangspoort voor internationale handel verving, kende het een spectaculaire economische expansie.1 In de loop van enkele decennia werd de stad getransformeerd van een medium- middelgrote Brabantse stad tot de grootste metropool van de † Dit artikel is gebaseerd op een paper dat ik presenteerde tijdens de European Social Science History Conference 2016 in Valencia. Ik wil Frederik Buylaert, Frederik Peeraer, de redactie en de drie anonieme referenten bedanken voor hun commentaar op eerdere versies van dit artikel.1 Voor meer informatie over de economische expansie van Antwerpen, zie H. Van der Wee, The Growth of the Antwerp Market and the European Economie, 3 vols. (Den Haag, 1963); O.Gelderblom, Cities ofCommerce: de institutionele grondslagen van de internationale handel in de Lage Landen, 1250–1650 (Princeton, 2013), 27–32. Voor een overzicht van het economisch belang van Antwerpen tijdens de veertiende eeuw, zie M. Limberger, 'Regionale en interregionale handelsnetwerken en commercieel © Cambridge University Press 2019Urban History (2019), 1–21doi: 10.1017 / S096392681900066Xuse, beschikbaar op https: // www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownload van https://www.cambridge.org/core. Universiteit Antwerpen, op 17 oktober 2019 om 13:41:05, onderworpen aan de Cambridge Core-voorwaarden van gedomineerd door personen wier inkomsten uit de handel kwamen, hetzij direct (egmerchants) of indirect (bijv. makelaars). 8 Amsterdam, dat in de zeventiende eeuw als poortstad van Nederland fungeerde, werd ook geregeerd door handelaars. , was de koopvaardijgemeenschap van Antwerpen grotendeels afwezig in de gemeenteraad.10 Antwerpen is dus relevant voor lopende debatten over premoderne elites, omdat deze stad blijkbaar een heel ander traject presenteert dan dat wat wordt getoond door andere gateway-steden. samenstelling van de kantoorhouders zag weinig verandering tijdens de 'Gouden Eeuw' van Antwerpen.In de vijftiende eeuw bestond de gemeenteraad uit 12 wethouders, een aantal dat in 1490 werd verhoogd tot 16 wethouders. Vanaf 1409 traden twee burgemeesters toe tot de gemeenteraad. De 'externalmayor' (buitenburgemeester), die niet uit de schepenen kon worden gekozen, werd de belangrijkste figuur omdat hij de belangen van de stad buiten de grenzen vertegenwoordigde, bijvoorbeeld aan het prinselijk hof. De 'burgemeester' (binnenburgemeester), gekozen uit de schepenen, was verantwoordelijk voor de interne aangelegenheden van de stad. Elk jaar veranderde deze gemeenteraad: de helft van de schepenen werd vervangen en de helft bleef behouden. Deze nieuwe wethoudersbank selecteerde vervolgens de twee nieuwe burgemeesters. De wethouders en de twee burgemeesters waren gezamenlijk verantwoordelijk voor het dagelijkse bestuur van de stad. De beslissing over welke van de schepenen zou blijven en welke plaats moest innemen werd genomen door de hertog van Brabant, heer van Antwerpen. Tot 1477 was de hertog vrij om te kiezen wie als vervanger zou dienen (zie figuur 3) .11 Vervolgens was de hertog verplicht om de vervangers te selecteren uit een lijst van kandidaten voorgesteld door de gemeenteraad in functie en de wijkmeesters (wijkmeesters, vertegenwoordigers van thepoorterij12). 13 Kandidaten voor de gemeente moesten aan bepaalde eisen voldoen.First, the can-didate had to be of legitimate birth, at least 25 years old, born in the duchy ofBrabant, a citizen of Antwerp for at least a year and a day, and not living in adul-tery. Second, theten derdalven lederule prohibited aldermen from serving on thesame bench as their father, grandfather, brother(s) or cousin(s). This rule preventedthe city council from becoming monopolized by a few families. The third and final8J. Dumolyn,De Brugse opstand van 1436–1438(Heule, 1997), 111–15.9J.E. Elias,De vroedschappen van Amsterdam, 2 vols. (Haarlem, 1903–05).10K. Wouters,‘Een open oligarchie? De machtsstructuur in de Antwerpse magistraat tijdens de periode1520–1555’,Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Filologie en Geschiedenis, 82 (2004), 905–34; K. Wouters,‘De invloedvan verwantschap op de machtsstrijd binnen de Antwerpse politieke elite’,Tijdschrift voor sociale geschie-denis, 28 (2002), 30–51; An M. Kint,‘The community of commerce: social relations in sixteenth-centuryAntwerp’, Columbia University Ph.D. thesis, 1996, 292; G. Marnef,Antwerp in the Age of Reformation.Underground Protestantism in a Commercial Metropolis, 1550–1577(Baltimore and London, 1996), 17.11In fact, before 1477 the number of aldermen being replaced fluctuated wildly.Database Janna Everaert, stadsbestuur Antwerpen 1394-1560, opgehaald op 6 februari 2018.12 De term poorterij heeft twee betekenissen. Juridisch gezien betekent thepoorterij alle mannen met burgerrechten in Antwerpen. Meer in het algemeen brengen de armen de welgestelde inwoners van de stad los van de ambachtslieden. In dit artikel heeft de term de laatste betekenis. De wijkmeesters vertegenwoordigden echter alle mannen die burgerschapsrechten hadden gekregen, inclusief de ambachtsgilden.13 Deze wijziging in het verkiezingsproces lijkt de samenstelling van de stadsraad niet te hebben beïnvloed. R. Boumans, Het Antwerps stadsbestuur voor en tijdens de Franse overheersing: bijdrage tot deontwikkelingsgeschiedenis van de stedelijke bestuursinstellingen in de Zuidelijke Nederlanden (Brugge, 1965), 13.4Janna Everaertuse, beschikbaar op https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms . https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownload van https://www.cambridge.org/core. Universiteit Antwerpen, op 17 oktober 2019 om 13:41:05, onderworpen aan de Cambridge Core-voorwaarden van beperking was dat het leden van ambachtsgilden verboden was om in de gemeenteraad te dienen.Dus in tegenstelling tot de situatie in veel grote steden in de Zuidelijke Lage Landen, kon de groeiende gemeenschap van ambachtslieden in Antwerpen geen permanente vertegenwoordiging krijgen in de gemeenteraad.14 Uitgezonderd voor een korte periode van co-heerschappij tussen de ambachtsgilden en de poorterij (1477 tot 1486) na de zogenaamde Quaeye Werelt (opstand Angry World) werden de ambachtsgilden van macht uitgesloten.15 Als gevolg hiervan bleef het stadsbestuur geconcentreerd in de handen van leden van thepoorterij.16 Echter, of het profiel van deze leden veranderde in de Gouden Eeuw van Antwerpen is nog steeds een onderwerp van debat. Figuur 3. Schema van het verkiezingsproces van de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen tussen 1477 en 155514M. Prak, ‘Bedrijfspolitiek in de Lage Landen: gilden als instellingen, 14e tot 18e eeuw’, inM. Praket al. (ed.), Craft Guilds in the Early Modern Low Countries. Werk, macht en vertegenwoordiging (Aldershot, 2006), 74–106.15 In plaats daarvan kregen de ambachtslieden een rol in twee raden, de zogenaamde maandagraad - vanaf 1435 - en de brede raad. Eerstgenoemde had echter slechts een adviserende functie en de laatste oefende tot het laatste kwart van de zestiende eeuw geen echte macht uit. Geen van deze raden speelde een rol bij de verkiezing van de gemeenteraad.Voor meer informatie over deze raden, zie Boumans, HetAntwerps stadsbestuur, 21–43; voor een Engels overzicht van de verschillende politieke instellingen in Antwerpen, zie Marnef, Antwerp in the Age, 14–22.16 Slechts 3 van de 162 politieke families hadden een connectie met ambachtelijke gildecirkels: de families Hoon, Schoyteand Mannaert. De telg van deze families lijken echter zelf geen ambachtslieden te zijn geweest. Database Janna Everaert, stadsbestuur Antwerpen 1394-1560, heeft 6 februari 2018 opgehaald. Stedelijke geschiedenis5use, beschikbaar op https://www.cambridge.org/core/ voorwaarden. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownload van https://www.cambridge.org/core. Universiteit Antwerpen, op 17 oktober 2019 om 13:41:05, onderworpen aan de Cambridge Core-voorwaarden van Terwijl de aard, oorzaken en timing van de economische expansie van Antwerpen tussen c. 1400 andc. 1550 is het onderwerp geweest van een voortdurende onderzoekstraditie die teruggaat tot het baanbrekende werk van Herman van der Wee in de jaren 1960, 17theimpact van de transformatie van de stad naar de politieke elite heeft veel minder aandacht gekregen.Huidige theorieën over het uitzonderlijke traject van Antwerpen in elitevorming vloeien voort uit het verkennend onderzoek van An Kint voor de periode 1490-1560 en Koen Wouters voor 1520–55.18 Beide historici zijn het erover eens dat er een verrassend klein aantal kooplieden in de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen waren, maar zij huidige diametraal tegenovergestelde interpretaties van de impact van de economische en demografische groei op de samenstelling van de gemeenteraad. Volgens Kint heeft economische groei geleid tot een radicale verandering in de samenstelling van de gemeenteraad, zodat, hoewel de stemmingsmuzikanten misschien niet in de gemeenteraad waren opgenomen, de 'traditionele markers van politieke participatie, zoals voorouders en endogamie, geleidelijk aan plaats maakten voor een aantal indicatoren, zoals universitaire opleiding'.19 Door de toevoeging van meer universitair geschoolde mannen zou de gemeenteraad de nieuwe functie van de stad als arena voor steeds complexere commerciële transacties waarbij zakelijke partners uit vrijwel alle uithoeken van Europa betrokken waren, aankunnen. Wouters weerlegt daarentegen de beweringen van Kint dat hij het voortdurende belang van endogamie en verwantschapsverhoudingen binnen een 'patriciate' benadrukt. Hoewel enkele nieuwkomers tussen 1520 en 1555 de stad zijn binnengekomen, beschouwt Wouters de Gouden Eeuw van Antwerpen als een perode van sociale en politieke continuïteit.Het stadsbestuur, beweert hij, bleef gedomineerd door dezelfde politieke dynastieën als die welke sinds de veertiende en vijftiende eeuw aan de macht waren. Hij noemt daarom de politieke elite van de Antwerpse 'open oligarchie'.20 Omdat het onderzoek van Kint tot nu toe niet is gepubliceerd, is het Wouters interpretatie die de geschiedschrijving over de Gouden Eeuw van Antwerpen domineert. Omdat noch Kint noch Wouters hun resultaten vergeleken met de pre-groeiperiode, blijven beide claims echter zeer hypothetisch.21 Ook werd hun onderzoek belemmerd door het ontbreken van diepgaande studies naar de koopvaardijgemeenschappen in Antwerpen, die pas recent beschikbaar zijn gekomen. In wat volgt, ga ik opnieuw in op de vraag of Antwerpen een uitzondering vormt op het gevestigde patroon van elitevorming, en, zo ja, waarom. Ik focus op de sociale samenstelling van de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen en hoe dit zich in de loop van de tijd heeft ontwikkeld. Een analyse van de periode vanaf het begin van 17 Voor twee recente onderzoeken die toegang bieden tot de uitgebreide geschiedschrijving, zie Gelderblom, Cities ofCommerce; J. Puttevils, handelaars en handel in de zestiende eeuw. The Golden Age of Antwerp (London, 2015) .18 Als inleiding op zijn studie over Antwerpen tijdens de Reformatie bespreekt Guido Marnef ook de samenstelling van de Antwerpse gemeenteraad tussen 1550 en 1560.Marnef, Antwerpen in het tijdperk, 14-17.19Kint, ‘De gemeenschap van koophandel’, 292.20Wouters, ‘De invloed’, 55–6; Wouters, ‘Een open oligarchie?’, 933–4.21Wouters maakt enkele voorzichtige vergelijkingen met de periode vóór 1477, maar hij vermeldt niet welke bronnen of literatuur hij voor deze vergelijking gebruikte. Hij gebruikte waarschijnlijk de lijsten van de leden van de gemeenteraad samengesteld en gepubliceerd door Floris Prims. F. Prims, Geschiedenis van Antwerpen – VII: Onder deeerste Habsburgers – 1: De politische orde (Antwerpen, 1938). Toch verklaart Wouters zelf dat deze lijsten verre van volledig en verre van foutloos zijn. Bovendien maakten noch Kint noch Wouters gebruik van de niet-gepubliceerde masterproef van Tahon over de vijftiende-eeuwse gemeenteraad van Antwerpen. G. Tahon, 'De schepen-bank van Antwerpen, einde 14de-15de eeuw: samenstelling, sociaal-economische status van de schepenen', 2 vols., Universiteit Gent MA scriptie, 1984.6Janna Everaertuse, beschikbaar op https: // www. cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownload van https://www.cambridge.org/core.Universiteit Antwerpen, op 17 oktober 2019 om 13:41:05, onderworpen aan de Cambridge Core-voorwaarden van De commerciële uitbreiding van Antwerpen rond 1400 tot het hoogtepunt van de stad rond 155022 kan onthullen of de politieke elite van de Gouden Eeuw van Antwerpen dezelfde sociale configuratie had als zijn middeleeuwse voorgangers. De volgende parameters zijn cruciaal: (1) familietraditie en verwantschapsbanden in de stedelijke politiek, (2) economische achtergrond (koopman of niet) en (3) academische opleiding. Een analyse van deze parameters zal helpen om de casus van Antwerpen te situeren in de huidige discussies over stedelijke eliteformatie en een licht werpen op de vraag: past Antwerpen in de algemene trend naar oligarchie in Europese steden in de vroege moderne tijd of, in tegendeel, heeft het zijn gemeenteraad opengesteld voor de handelsklasse? Stedelijke politiek: een familieaangelegenheid Het beste uitgangspunt is om te beoordelen of de Antwerpse politieke elite een 'patriciate' was, dat wil zeggen een groep van gehuwde gezinnen met een bijna-erfelijke claimtopower, of een meer vloeiende groep die een constante instroom van nieuwe gezinnen met verschillende sociale achtergronden accepteerde. Om deze vraag te beantwoorden, reconstrueerde ik de samenstelling van de gemeenteraad tijdens de periode van economische groei en de daaraan voorafgaande periode.Elk jaar werd de nieuwe samenstelling van de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen opgenomen in de registers van schepen (schepenregisters) en het boek van schepenen (wethou-dersboek) .23 Dankzij deze bronnen heb ik een volledige lijst van alle mannen (hierna genoemd kantoor) -houders) die de 1477 beschikbare zetels in de gemeenteraad hielden tussen 1400 en 1549,24 Een breed scala aan ander gepubliceerd en niet-gepubliceerd onderzoek verstrekte informatie over de sociaal-economische achtergrond en familiebanden van deze politieke elite.25 Om te beoordelen hoe de sociale samenstelling van de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen geëvolueerd, verdeelde ik de studieperiode van 150 jaar in vijf tijdscohorten van 30 jaar. Terwijl de eerste twee cohorten (1400–29 en 1430-59) een fase van bescheiden demografische en economische groei dekken, omvat de derde (1460-89) de korte levensduur22Deze studie eindigt om verschillende redenen in 1550. Ten eerste is de periode 1550–66 al grondig beschreven door Guido Marnef. Ten tweede waren er in deze periode de eerste tekenen van economische achteruitgang. Ten slotte waren de 1550s en 1560s getuige van toenemende religieuze spanningen, en het ontwarren van de invloed van deze variabelen zou aanvullend onderzoek vereisen. Marnef, Antwerpen in het tijdperk, 14–17; H.Soly,‘De schepenregisters alsbron voor de conjunctuurgeschiedenis van Zuid- en Noordnederlandse steden in het Ancien Régime.Een concreet voorbeeld: de Antwerpse immobiliënmarkt in de 16de eeuw’,Tijdschrift voor geschiedenis,87 (1974), 521–44.23The city council was renewed annually on 30 November until 1538, after which the renewal took placeat Easter. Stadsarchief Antwerpen (SAA), Schepenregisters (SR), nos. 1–272; the book of aldermen, whichwas drawn up in the sixteenth century, was used to fill the gap in the registers of aldermen between 1480and 1489. SAA, Privilegiekamer (PK), no. 1341. F. Prims,‘Onze Antwerpsche wethoudersboeken’,inAntwerpiensia 1932. Losse Bijdragen tot de Antwerpsche Geschiedenis(Antwerp, 1933), 252–60.24This list and additional information on family relations, university training, date of birth and deathand economic status were gathered in one database. Database Janna Everaert, City Government Antwerp1394–1560, retrieved 6 Feb. 2018 (referred to as CGA in the tables and figures).25The main sources on the political elite as a social body were SAA, PK, nos. 3254–67, 3272 (L.Bisschops,‘Genealogische Nota’s’); Tahon,‘De schepenbank van Antwerpen’; K. Wouters,‘Tussen ver-wantschap en vermogen.De politieke elite in Antwerpen (1520–1555). Een elite onderzoek door middelvan de prosopografische methode’, Vrije Universiteit Brussel MA thesis, 2001; P. De Win,‘De adel inhet hertogdom Brabant in de vijftiende eeuw (ingezonderd de periode 1430–1482)’, Ghent UniversityMA thesis, 1979; H. De Ridder-Symoens,‘De universitaire vorming van de Brabantse stadsmagistraat enstadsfuctionarissen: Leuven en Antwerpen, 1430–1580’,Varia Historica Brabantica,6–7 (1978), 26–32.Urban History7use, available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core. University of Antwerp, on 17 Oct 2019 at 13:41:05, subject to the Cambridge Core terms of experiment of corporate participation in urban government (1477–86). The last twotime cohorts encompass Antwerp’s Golden Age.Ze komen ruwweg overeen met de eerste fase van economische groei (1490-1519), waarin Antwerpen de rol van Brugge als gateway-stad en de tweede fase (1520-1549) overnam, toen de stad evolueerde van een eerlijke stad naar een belangrijke commerciële en financiële centrum dat cruciaal was voor zowel de Lage Landen als West-Europa als geheel. Ik bracht in kaart welke families de politieke elite van de stad vormden (hierna 'politieke families' genoemd), hoe lang ze actief waren in de gemeenteraad, hoeveel mandaten ze hadden en hoe ze onderling verband hielden. Volgens de definitie die in eerder onderzoek algemeen werd aanvaard, definieerde ik een familie als alle personen met een gemeenschappelijke achternaam. Als gevolg hiervan zijn deze 'families' beter vergelijkbaar met patrilineaire lijnen dan met huishoudens, omdat zelfs onder de elite de meeste huishoudens uit de nucleaire familie bestonden.Hoewel deze keuze pragmatisch was, bevestigt de wederopbouw van familierelaties en stambomen dat deze personen met een gemeenschappelijke naam aan elkaar kunnen worden gekoppeld door verwantschapsbanden.26 Bovendien, recent onderzoek naar het belang van de uitgebreide familie voor elites en middengroepen in de vijftiende- en het zestiende-eeuwse Brabant onthult dat deze keuze om afstammelingen te bestuderen ook sociale mores weerspiegelt: stedelijke elites, net als de landelijke adel, neigden zichzelf te identificeren als patrilineaire families (geslachten) .27 Dat wil niet zeggen dat het concept van de uitgebreide familie statisch was: sommige van de leidende politieke dynastieën kwamen voort uit dezelfde stamboom, maar veranderden vervolgens hun tak nadat ze vervreemd waren geraakt van de hoofdtak of nadat ze een belangrijk bezit hadden gekregen, zoals een vorstin. De familie Van Liere heeft zich bijvoorbeeld losgekoppeld van de familie Van Immerseele.28 Dit gebeurde echter zelden en, afgezien van een zekere plasticiteit in de manier waarop zij zichzelf definieerde, is de patrilineaire familie de analyse-eenheid die het beste overeenkomt met hoe tijdgenoten het sociale weefsel van de stad analyseerden De reconstructie van de Antwerpse politieke elite van 1400-1550 is samengevat in tabel 1 en figuur 4, die de instroom en uitstroom van gezinnen in de gemeenteraad laten zien. Dit onthult allereerst dat de sociale vernieuwing in de loop van de tijd aanzienlijk was.Terwijl het aantal gezinnen dat de beschikbare zitplaatsen op de bank van schepenen had, in de loop van de tijd redelijk stabiel bleef - meestal ongeveer 50 tot 60 gezinnen voor elke keer cohort - waren de families die de Antwerpse politieke elite vormden in 1520-49 in de eerste plaats die de stad regeerden in 1400–29.29 Van de 57 families die een schepen tussen 1520 en 1549 hadden, konden er slechts 16 hun politieke activiteiten herhalen tot vóór 1460. Er zijn drie oorzaken voor dit constante proces van sociale vernieuwing. De eerste was een tekort aan mannelijke erfgenamen. In de regel leverde slechts drie van de vijf huwelijken een volwassen zoon op26. De genealogische aantekeningen over deze families door L. Bisschops waren zeer waardevol bij het bepalen welke individuen tot dezelfde familie behoorden en welke niet. Dankzij deze bron kon ik de analyse verfijnen en het probleem van homoniemen oplossen. SAA, PK, nrs. 3254–67, 3272.27K. Overlaet, ‘Familiaal kapitaal. De familiale netwerken van testateurs in het zestiende-eeuwse Mechelen ’, Universiteit Antwerpen Ph.D. scriptie, 2015, 227–32; B. Blondé, F. Buylaert, J. Dumolyn, J. Hanusand P. Stabel, ‘Samenleven in de stad: sociale relaties tussen ideaal en realiteit’, in A.L. Van Bruaene, B. Blondé en M. Boone (eds.), Gouden Eeuwen. Stad en samenleving in de Lage Landen, ca.1100–1600 (Gent, 2016), 77–120.28 De Win, 'De adel', 388.29 Alle politiek actieve families werden verdeeld in vijf cohorten van 30 jaar, afhankelijk van de eerste keer dat deze familie in de lijsten van ambtsdragers werd genoemd tussen 1400 en 1550.8Janna Everaertuse, beschikbaar op https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownload van https://www.cambridge.org/core. Universiteit Antwerpen, op 17 oktober 2019 om 13:41:05, onderworpen aan de Cambridge Core-voorwaarden van en politiek was een zaak die alleen voor mannen was.30 De familie Van der Elst bijvoorbeeld, werd uitgeroeid in de mannelijke lijn. Een andere reden waarom gezinnen uit het stadsbestuur verdwenen, was migratie.31 Adriaen van Doren, wethouder in Antwerpen, verhuisde bijvoorbeeld naar Breda en werd daar burgemeester.32 Anderzijds leidde migratie soms tot de instroom van nieuwe gezinnen, vooral als hun leden hadden politieke loopbanen genoten in hun stad van herkomst.Jan van Gottignies trad bijvoorbeeld in 1514 toe tot de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen en maakte deel uit van een invloedrijke wethoudersfamilie uit Mechelen.33 Een derde reden waarom een ​​politieke carrière kon eindigen was een slinkend familiefortuin.34 Als gevolg van deze factoren, elke tabel 1.In- en uitstroom van politiek actieve gezinnen in de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen, 1400-15491400–291430–591460–891490–15191520–49Families 1400–295929161410Nieuwe gezinnen 1430–590221186Nieuwe gezinnen 1460–890040127Nieuwe gezinnen 1490–1519000169Nieuwe families 1520–490079575092595075095092595095092590090090098590090090099009009509509009009009859 Figuur 4. Instroom en uitstroom van politiek actieve gezinnen in de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen, 1400-1549 Bron: CGA.30M. Nassiet, ‘Parenté et successions dynastiques aux 14e et 15e siècles’, Annales. Histoire, SciencesSociales, 3 (1995), 621.31Wouters, ‘De invloed’, 43; database Janna Everaert, stadsbestuur Antwerpen 1394-1560, opgehaald 6Feb. 2018.32Wouters, ‘De invloed’, 44.33 Zie de bijdrage van Frederik Buylaert aan dit speciale gedeelte.34 Deze kantoren leverden een zeer laag inkomen op, wat de elitaire levensstijl van kantoorhouders niet kon ondersteunen. Voor meer informatie over hun loon, zie Tahon, ‘De schepenbank van Antwerpen’, vol.I, 111.Urban History9use, beschikbaar op https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownload van https://www.cambridge.org/core. Universiteit Antwerpen, op 17 oktober 2019 om 13:41:05, onderworpen aan de Cambridge Core-voorwaarden van jaar verdwenen een aantal families van het politieke toneel en werden vervangen door nieuwe families in de gemeenteraad. Dus de Antwerpse politieke elite was in constante socialflux. Het concept van een 'patriciate', zoals in een stabiele groep families die een stad over een langere periode regeren, is daarom niet van toepassing op de politieke elite van Antwerpen, maar beschrijft wel een kern van prominente families met deze elite. De claim van Koen Wouters dat de zestiende-eeuwse elite gewoon een voortzetting was van de sociale configuratie van de middeleeuwen, is gebaseerd op een atypische en selecte groep gezinnen. De neiging om de Antwerpse politieke elite als een 'patriciate' te beschouwen is begrijpelijk, voor zover er zeker echte 'politieke dynastieën' waren die uitzonderlijk krachtig waren, waarvan sommige opmerkelijk lang meegingen. Tabel 2 toont de negen toonaangevende politieke dynastieën die meer dan 25 Wouters verwees naar deze dynastieke families toen hij verklaarde dat de stadsbestuur onder controle stond van een 'patriciaat' dat sinds de veertiende eeuw Antwerpen had geregeerd.Ongetwijfeld hadden veel van deze families een lange traditie van stedelijke politiek. Leden van de families Van Halmale, Van derElst, Van Berchem, Van Ranst en Schoyte werden al in de veertiende eeuw schepen in Antwerpen. De politieke macht van de families Drake en Van denWerve gaat zelfs terug tot de dertiende eeuw.35 Het opgebouwde politieke kapitaal en de ervaring - voor zover het werd overgedragen van de ene generatie op de volgende - moet een groot voordeel zijn geweest voor de nieuwe generaties van deze families die wilden een politieke carrière beginnen. Als het niets anders is, moet het deze families een aanzienlijk aanzien hebben geschonken. Alleen de krachtige Van Liere-familie was een laatbloeier. De eerste stedelijke politicus van de familie trad in 1465 in dienst en de Van Lieres ging vervolgens over tot het genereren van een vrijwel ononderbroken stroom van ambtsdragers tot 1538, waardoor hij toetrad tot de gelederen van de belangrijkste politieke dynastieën van de stad. Maar de invloed van deze politieke dynastieën, hoe groot ook waargenomen op lange termijn, fluctueerde sterk in de tijd. De familie Van der Elst behoorde bijvoorbeeld tot de leidende dynastieën aan het begin van de vijftiende eeuw, omdat het de familie met de meeste mandaten was tussen 1400 en 1429, maar het politieke gewicht nam geleidelijk af en de familie verdween van het toneel in de jaren 1520.Het aantal zetels op de bank van schepenen daarentegen in de tabel 2. Toonaangevende politieke dynastieën in de Gemeenteraad van Antwerpen, 1400-1549 Familie Aantal mandaten Percentage Aantal kantoorhouders Percentage Van den Werve 1516,94% 226,45% Van Berchem 1084,96% 154.40% Drake1024.69% 102.93% Van Halmale823.77% 113.23% Van Liere632.89% 72.05% Van der Elst612.80% 92,64% Van Ranst582.66% 72.05% Schoyte542.48% 41.17% Van Immerseele522.39% 61,76% Totaal voor de gehele periode177100% 341100% Bron: CGA.35Ibid., 66.10Janna Everaertuse, beschikbaar op https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownload van https://www.cambridge.org/core. Universiteit Antwerpen, op 17 oktober 2019 om 13:41:05, onderworpen aan de Cambridge Core-voorwaarden van De families Van Halmale, Drake en Van Berchem waren vrij bescheiden in het begin van de vijftiende eeuw, maar het cijfer steeg spectaculair zodat ze in de jaren 1490 tot de top vijf van belangrijkste politieke families behoorden. De enige familie wiens politieke fortuin nooit wankelde was de familie Van den Werve. Ze slaagden erin om gedurende de hele periode een dominante positie in de gemeenteraad te behouden, omdat ze in 119 van het 150 jaar durende onderzoek ten minste één ambtsdrager aan de gemeenteraad leverden.In vergelijking met de andere vooraanstaande politieke dynastieën is de constante aanwezigheid van de familie Van den Werve in de Antwerp City City Council echter de uitzondering, niet de regel. Wat nog belangrijker is, de politieke dynastieën vormden slechts een klein segment van de 162 verschillende families die tussen 1400 en 1550 ten minste één wethouder aan de gemeenteraad leverden. Hoewel de hierboven besproken politieke dynastieën vrijwel constant vertegenwoordigd waren in de gemeenteraad, was dit niet het geval voor de meerderheid van de andere families, die vaak werden vervangen. Desalniettemin bleef de politieke elite van Antwerpen in de tijd stabiel, zij het op een andere manier dan beweerd door Wouters. Ten eerste fluctueerde het aantal gezinnen waaruit de politieke elite bestond slechts licht in de tijd. In de loop van de vijftiende eeuw daalde het aantal politieke families (zie tabel 1) van 59 naar 51, met een uitzonderlijke piek van 67 in het cohort 1460-89 omdat dit de periode van co-heerschappij door de ambachtsgilden en de poorterij omvat (1477– 85). Deze kortstondige uitbreiding van de politieke macht leidde tot de instroom van 26 ambachtsgildefamilies, die snel weer werden uitgeworpen.36 Het aantal politieke families daalde vervolgens tot het laagste niveau van pre-1477, met 50 gezinnen.Tijdens de tweede fase van de economische groei van Antwerpen breidde de politieke elite zich opnieuw uit tot bijna het niveau van de vroege vijftiende eeuw. Een andere bevinding is dat gedurende de 150-jarige onderzoeksperiode de interne machtsverhoudingen binnen de politieke elite stabiel bleven, omdat onthuld door Figuur 5. Deze Lorenz-curve toont, voor elk van de vijf tijdscohorten, alle families met ten minste één mandaat hiërarchisch geordend van laag naar hoog in een cumulatieve weg volgens het aantal kantoren dat ze bekleedden. In de regel had de top 7 en 18 procent van de politieke families respectievelijk 25 en 50 procent van alle kantoren. Bycontrast, de onderste 18 procent van alle gezinnen had amper 3 procent. Alleen het cohort1520–49 heeft een iets andere verdeling van mandaten, aangezien meer gezinnen slechts één of twee kantoren hadden. Deze waarneming doet vraagtekens bij de huidige speculaties dat de zestiende-eeuwse elite-configuraties een voortzetting waren van de per-jod vóór 1520. Deze resultaten tonen ook aan dat, ondanks de explosie in de Antwerpse bevolking van 10.000 tot 100.000 inwoners en de toename van de aantal zetels in de gemeenteraad van 12 tot 16, de sociale basis van de politieke eliteid niet uitbreiden.In feite werd de politieke elite een meer exclusieve groep in de stedelijke samenleving. 36 Deze 26 gezinnen waren nieuw in de gemeenteraad met uitzondering van de familie Schoyte, ascraftsman-wethouder Aert Schoyte senior was de neef van Jan Schoyte, die de gemeenteraad was binnengekomen 1449 als apoorter. Na 1485 slaagden drie zonen van ambachtslieden-wethouders erin de politieke eliteas-vertegenwoordigers van thepoorterij te betreden: Aert Schoyte junior, Joos Mannaert en Joos Hoon. Tahon, ‘De schepen-bank van Antwerpen’, vol. I, 73, vol. II, 83. Stedelijke geschiedenis11use, beschikbaar op https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S096392681900066XDownload van https://www.cambridge.org/core. Universiteit Antwerpen, op 17 oktober 2019 om 13:41:05, onderworpen aan de Cambridge Core-voorwaarden van

Servicevoorwaarden

Alle uitgevoerde vertalingen worden opgeslagen in de database. De opgeslagen gegevens worden openlijk en anoniem op de website gepubliceerd. Om deze reden herinneren wij u eraan dat uw informatie en persoonlijke gegevens niet mogen worden opgenomen in de vertalingen die u maakt. De inhoud van de vertalingen van gebruikers kan bestaan uit jargon, godslastering, seksualiteit en dergelijke. Wij raden u aan om onze website niet te gebruiken in ongemakkelijke situaties, omdat de gemaakte vertalingen mogelijk niet geschikt zijn voor mensen van alle leeftijden en bezienswaardigheden. Als in de context van de vertaling van onze gebruikers, zijn er beledigingen aan persoonlijkheid en of auteursrecht, enz. u kunt ons per e-mail, →"Contact" contacteren.


Privacybeleid

Externe leveranciers, waaronder Google, gebruiken cookies om advertenties weer te geven op basis van eerdere bezoeken van een gebruiker aan uw website of aan andere websites. Met advertentiecookies kunnen Google en zijn partners advertenties weergeven aan uw gebruikers op basis van hun bezoek aan uw sites en/of andere sites op internet. Gebruikers kunnen zich afmelden voor gepersonaliseerde advertenties door Advertentie-instellingen te bezoeken. (U kunt gebruikers ook laten weten dat ze zich voor het gebruik van cookies voor gepersonaliseerde advertenties door externe leveranciers kunnen afmelden door aboutads.info te bezoeken.)